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Humanity & Inclusion became the new name of Handicap International on Jan. 24.

Featured beneficiary story

Fayaz stands tall with pride

Fayaz, 7, is a survivor. Four years ago, he and his big sister, Simran, were playing close to their home in war-torn Kashmir when she found an object she thought was a ball. Simran bent down to pick it up and an explosion rang out.

That day, Fayaz lost his sister and both of his legs.

“I can still hear them screaming,” their mother Firdousa explains. “It was a living nightmare.”We were living in a village contaminated by explosive remnants of war. What my daughter found was an explosive shell left on the ground. She died on the spot.”

When Firdousa and her husband, Reyaz arrived at the hospital to see Fayaz, her husband told her to stay calm. He knew it would be quite a shock for her to see their young son lying in bed, with two stumps instead of legs.  

“I just wanted to end it all,” Firdousa says while looking back on that dark day. “I took Fayaz in my arms. He asked me why I was crying. I said I had a cold. Day after day, he kept telling the doctors: ‘Give me some poison to kill the pain. I don’t want my mom to worry.’”

The following days and weeks were tough. The family packed their bags and said goodbye to their friends and family. They had to leave the place they called home so that Fayaz could be closer to the health centers.

That's when Fayaz met Humanity & Inclusion. Our rehabilitation team immediately started physical therapy exercises to help loosen his limbs and gain the strength needed for artificial legs.

Fayaz tried to overcome his loneliness, the sense of injustice, and to understand what has happened, asking: “If I grow, will my legs grow too? If they put a bandage on my sister’s head like they did with my leg, will it make her come back?” He was a heartbroken little boy, but thanks to our donors, Fayaz and his family found hope.

“Fayaz is a very active child,” Muddasir Ashraf, Humanity & Inclusion’s disability manager in India explains. “His little arms are very strong. But he needs to learn to use his artificial legs properly and to develop his balance."

After receiving physical therapy and two artificial legs, he stands tall and smiles with pride.

Fayaz is growing up fast. Throughout his life, he will need 25 pairs of artificial legs and ongoing physical therapy so he can continue walking to school and playing cricket with his friends. You can help. Give a gift today.

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Fayaz who lost both of his legs from an explosive remnant of war in India plays cricket with his friends.