COVID-19 Emergency

Michele Lunsford

  • Togo | Providing essential care to Lomé's homeless

    In Lomé, the capital of Togo, COVID-19 restrictions have made the lives of homeless people even more difficult—many of which are children and single mothers. Humanity & Inclusion’s teams visit the streets at night to assist them as their precarious living conditions have worsened. We recently checked in with one of Humanity & Inclusion’s staff members Eli Koffi Afossogb who shares more about our outreach in Lomé:

    Assisting the homeless

    Humanity & Inclusion launched a series of actions to promote the basic hygiene of homeless people in Lomé and supply them with food aid, and to help reassure the rest of the population about their state of health. In the future, our actions will include opening two centers for the most vulnerable, including children, isolated women, and people with disabilities, where they can get a health check and psychosocial support. Two mobile teams visit neighborhoods at night to provide consultations. Our goal is to help 3,000 people.

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    Earning an income doing odd jobs & begging

    At least 15,000 people live on the streets of Lomé, a city of two million inhabitants. Many are children, teenagers, and single mothers with young children. Before the pandemic, they often earned money doing odd jobs at the Grand Marché in Lomé, such as carrying groceries or parcels for customers or traders. Begging was an important source of income for them, enabling them to just about survive.

    Businesses on lockdown

    As a result of the curfew and the restrictions put in place from March to May to prevent the spread of COVID-19, the Grand Marché was closed and the homeless lost their source of income. Although the restrictions were lifted in June, the recovery has been slow. There are fewer odd jobs to do. People who are afraid of them because they see them as potential vectors of disease are more reluctant to give them money when they beg, leading to a serious deterioration in their living conditions.

    Not enough to eat

    Restaurants were also forced to close for two months. Many homeless people used to eat what restaurants threw out. Only some of the restaurants have reopened, leading to a spike in cases of undernourishment.

    Desperate & overwhelmed children

    Some homeless people have been forced from the places where they used to sleep. Before the curfew, a group of children aged between nine and 15-years-old used to sleep near the post office. Now they spend the night on the pavement. Some are at risk of sexual abuse. We have seen children overwhelmed by fear and despair.

    Focus on the most vulnerable 

    As COVID-19 takes aim at our planet's most vulnerable neighbors, Humanity & Inclusion donors ensure that people with disabilities, people with injuries from conflict, children, women, and especially older people have the information--and even the soap--they need to stay healthy. Learn more about Humanity & Inclusion's vast COVID-19 response.

    Begin a monthly gift today to help sustain this work and reach as many people as possible.

    Become a monthly donor


  • Cambodia | Resuming rehabilitation care & protecting the most vulnerable

    Humanity & Inclusion has resumed its activities in Cambodia, which include COVID-19 awareness-raising, rehabilitation care, and inclusive employment.

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    Humanity & Inclusion’s team recently organized COVID-19 informational sessions for 30 disability organizations in 13 provinces in Cambodia all in partnership with WaterAid and Cambodian Organizations for People with Disabilities.

    After suspending other projects, our teams recently resumed training on inclusive employment, and mother and child health. Our COVID-19 awareness sessions for villagers are limited to 15 people, in line with prevention measures including temperatures being taken upon arrival. Everyone is also expected to respect social distancing rules and wear a mask.

    Humanity & Inclusion’s team is working hard to ensure that beneficiaries perform rehabilitation exercises while safe at home. Srun Vimean, a physical therapist at HI, shares concerns about the quality of these sessions performed without a physical therapist:

    "Patients who exercise at home may not have a lot of time and can forget the instructions we give them. There are no physical therapists present to correct them. Patients were recently able to return to HI’s rehabilitation center, which is a big improvement, but they are still not allowed to sleep there for security reasons. This makes it extremely complicated for some patients who live far from the center and need to rush back home. We are currently looking at ways to provide virtual rehabilitation sessions.”

    Focus on the most vulnerable 

    As COVID-19 takes aim at our planet's most vulnerable neighbors, Humanity & Inclusion donors ensure that people with disabilities, people with injuries from conflict, children, women, and especially older people have the information--and even the soap--they need to stay healthy. Learn more about Humanity & Inclusion's vast COVID-19 response.

    Begin a monthly gift today to help sustain this work and reach as many people as possible.

    Become a monthly donor


  • Kenya | Aruwa gains mobility and stays safe from COVID-19

    Aruwa is six years old. She lives with her mother, her uncle, and her siblings in the Kakuma refugee camp. Her mother does not work, and the family is completely dependent on humanitarian organizations. On top of their daily struggles, the family is also worried about Aruwa's health. The little girl has developed genu valgum, a deformity of the lower limbs. Her legs were bowed which made it difficult for her to move and run around with other children.

    That is, until she met Humanity & Inclusion. Our team arranged for Aruwa to have surgery, and since then, her life has changed drastically. With support from Stella, Humanity & Inclusion’s physical therapist, she can now move around on crutches. After each rehabilitation session with our team, Aruwa becomes more and more self-reliant.

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    Aruwa's physical therapist also teaches her how to protect herself from COVID-19.

    Today, Aruwa was invited to our rehabilitation center for a different reason: a COVID-19 prevention session. Stella teaches her how to wash her hands, wear a mask, and apply social distancing rules. The Kakuma refugee camp has not slipped under the pandemic’s radar. Quite the opposite. The overcrowding, lack of hygiene, equipment, and resources to fight the spread of the disease are aggravating risk factors.

    "I first heard about COVID-19 on the radio and when HI's physical therapist came to our home to treat Aruwa,” says Crouch Abdalla, Aruwa’s uncle who accompanies his niece to the center. “It's a serious disease that spreads very quickly. I haven't met anyone infected by it in the camp yet, but I know it kills a lot of people and I don't want anyone in my family or community to get it.”

    The pandemic makes life in the refugee camp even more difficult and precarious. 

    Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, life in the Kakuma refugee camp has been increasingly tough. "I arrived from Sudan in August 2014 and have been living here ever since,” her uncle continues. “We are always short of water and sometimes we have to fetch it from the neighboring camp, which is far from here. We drink even more now to protect ourselves.

    Many agencies have closed because of COVID-19, and it is difficult to find work and supplement our supplies, eat a balanced diet and find clothes for the family. It is incredibly stressful. I hope that after the end of the pandemic, when they lift the restrictions on our movements, we can go to work again, and the children can go back to school. I’m glad Humanity & Inclusion has been able to continue its work here and that Aruwa still benefits from the rehabilitation services. I really value the fact that she can do her exercises once a week, just like before! I also appreciate the information and training we receive from the HI team on COVID 19. It’s extremely useful!"

    Aruwa knows exactly what she wants to do after COVID-19. 

    "When the pandemic is over, I want to go back to school and learn, because when I grow up, I want to massage and rehabilitate other people. I also want to be able to play with my friends again like I used to," she says shyly but with determination.

    Focus on the most vulnerable 

    As COVID-19 takes aim at our planet's most vulnerable neighbors, Humanity & Inclusion donors ensure that people with disabilities, people with injuries from conflict, children, women, and especially older people have the information--and even the soap--they need to stay healthy. Learn more about Humanity & Inclusion's vast COVID-19 response.

    Begin a monthly gift today to help sustain this work and reach as many people as possible.

    Become a monthly donor


  • Thailand | Gaining confidence and making new friends

    Augustine Moo, 8, was born with cleft lip, leaving his parents in a tough situation to handle while raising four other children in very basic circumstances in the Thai temporary shelter camp where the Burmese family found shelter ten years ago. Augustine was a shy and insecure boy. That is, until he met Humanity & Inclusion.

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    Due to his lip, Augustine had difficulties communicating. For many years, he was mocked by other children and felt isolated and lonely. The teasing got better after Augustine’s surgery, but what really helped was his participation in the Growing Together children’s club, organized by Humanity & Inclusion. “In that club, Augustine developed communicative skills and learned how to engage in relationships with other children”, says his mother Ree Mah. Today, he is more confident which has made a positive impact on his friendships. Since starting the club, he has made some good friends. “So far, only boys,” Augustine adds, smiling shyly. “Sometimes I don’t know how to behave among all those girls.”

    Attending the Growing Together club has also had a big impact on his schooling. “Because of his isolation, Augustine wasn’t motivated at school, but now he’s more confident and really keen to perform well and catch up. I’m home tutoring him and now he’s the third best student of his class,” says his proud mother. 

    Growing Together Project

    Growing Together is a four-year project in Thailand, Pakistan, and Bangladesh, and is funded by the IKEA Foundation. Humanity & Inclusion is creating inclusive spaces where children can come together–through play–to work through some of the challenges they face, especially children with disabilities. In addition to inclusive playgrounds, Growing Together will target the youngest children who are at risk of developmental problems. Simultaneously, the program will engage local child development service providers and help them become more responsive to the needs of boys and girls with disabilities and other vulnerable children. Learn more about the partnership.


  • Myanmar: Concerns with upsurge in fighting in Rakhine State

    Myanmar: INGOs concerned upsurge in fighting in Rakhine State will cause greater hunger, displacement and vulnerability  

    As international humanitarian organizations working with communities throughout Rakhine State, we express deep concern for all those affected by the upsurge in fighting between the Arakan Army (AA) and the Myanmar Military in northern Rakhine State.  This area in and around the Kyauk Tan village tract is home to more than 10,000 people and local sources report many are fleeing from their homes while others are trapped and unable to leave. We are deeply concerned by reports of burning villages, indiscriminate fire, and the arbitrary detention of civilians.

    We urge all actors to protect civilians, exercise restraint and prevent the further escalation of conflict. Parties to the conflict must ensure full adherence to international humanitarian law and the protection of civilians.  The Government must uphold the human rights of all civilians within Rakhine and Chin States.

    We see first-hand the impact months of escalating fighting in Rakhine and Chin States is having on populations living in these areas. These latest operations will likely cause greater hunger, displacement and human suffering at a time when populations are dealing with COVID-19 and heavy rains from the monsoon season. Many children are at risk due to fighting and unable to attend school. Further, given that many farmers are now displaced during planting season, the recent escalation of fighting is further likely to negatively impact the long-term food security and livelihoods of impacted communities. Humanitarian access is already extremely limited and assistance is simply not able to reach many of the most impacted communities.

    We call for unfettered access for humanitarian actors and their partners so that they can independently asses needs and provide comprehensive assistance and protection to affected communities.  Unfettered access to all areas of Rakhine and Chin States for independent third parties, including journalists and human rights observers, should also be granted as soon as possible.

    Many INGOs are working in Rakhine and Chin, often in partnership with national and local organizations, to provide humanitarian relief and development assistance and deliver aid based only on need. We abide by the regulations administered by the Government of Myanmar in relation to the provision of assistance, and coordinate with Union and State Governments as well as civil society and local communities most affected by the conflict. We adhere to humanitarian principles of independence, neutrality and impartiality.

    We reiterate our earlier message to all parties to conflict to heed the call by the UN Secretary-General for a global ceasefire, extending to all parts of Myanmar without exceptions, to enable the protection of civilians and support efforts to prevent and respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, which continues to evolve in Myanmar.


  • India, Bangladesh, & Pakistan | COVID-19 is spreading at an alarming rate

    Humanity & Inclusion works in Bangladesh, India, and Pakistan, where COVID-19 is spreading at an alarming rate.

    South Asia has seen a worrying jump in COVID-19 cases, particularly in India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. The situation has made it especially difficult for the most vulnerable individuals to access health care and humanitarian aid.

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    India: the world’s fourth worst-affected country

    According to the World Health Organization, COVID-19 is spreading at an alarming rate in India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. Out of 565,000 confirmed cases, more than 330,000 were recorded in India, the world’s fourth worst-affected country.

    Two powerful typhoons: Amphan and Nisarga

    May 13, India and Bangladesh were also hit by Typhoon Amphan, affecting 71 million people, mainly in West Bengal, and Odisha in India. India was hit by another typhoon, Nisarga, on June 3. Due to social distancing guidelines, lack of space in evacuation centers, and other factors, the COVID-19 crisis further complicated evacuation efforts. Natural disasters considerably increase vulnerability during an epidemic.

    India: risk prevention

    The situation is particularly worrying in India, where more than 330,000 people have been affected by the epidemic. More than 70% of people with disabilities have experienced problems due to the lockdown and travel restrictions, including financial issues, difficulties accessing services, food, and the like . According to the International Labour Organization , as a result of the pandemic, some 400 million workers in the informal economy are at risk of falling deeper into poverty. They include more than 100 million migrant workers in India who have lost their jobs due to the lockdown and been forced to return to their region of origin, depriving their families of sometimes vital financial support. The situation is therefore likely to further increase inequalities in a country with a population of 1.3 billion, and more than 190 million undernourished people.

    Humanity & Inclusion is currently identifying the needs of people with disabilities in India and, in partnership with SPHERE INDIA, trains local organizations to be inclusive in their projects. Our team also translated COVID-19 prevention messages into sign language for individuals with hearing disabilities.

    Bangladesh: rehabilitation and psychological support

    In Bangladesh, more than 90,000 cases of contamination have been reported, although the actual figure is likely to be higher, given the country’s limited testing capacity. According to the World Food Program, around a quarter of the population—more than 160 million people—is food insecure, and one in three children have stunted growth due to acute malnutrition. The lockdown is likely to have a disastrous social and economic impact.

    In Bangladesh, and particularly in the Rohingya refugee camps, Humanity & Inclusion continues to provide rehabilitation and psychological support, and socio-economic support (through livestock breeding schemes, cash transfers, etc.) to more than 300 families. We also remotely assists some 1,400 people with disabilities, sharing advice on their sexual and reproductive lives. Our teams help train partner organizations to ensure they are inclusive to people with disabilities, so that no one is left on the sidelines.

    In response to rumors currently circulating in Rohingya refugee camps, the organization provides local people with information on the risk of contamination and how to protect themselves from it. Lastly, Humanity & Inclusion helps transport equipment to remote areas. We’ve supplied humanitarian organizations with 169 trucks and transported 653 tons of humanitarian supplies to refugee camps and storage centers.

    Pakistan: food distribution and awareness-raising

    The situation is very worrying in Pakistan. There has been a significant increase in the number of recorded cases (more than 140,000) and deaths in recent weeks. Lockdown measures have not been implemented.

    Humanity & Inclusion continues to operate in Pakistan. A project providing support to health centers in Afghan refugee camps in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province has been adapted by raising the COVID-19 risk awareness of health unit staff in refugee camps and local communities. Our team has also distributed food to the most vulnerable people, including children and young women with disabilities.

    Focus on the most vulnerable 

    As COVID-19 takes aim at our planet's most vulnerable neighbors, Humanity & Inclusion donors ensure that people with disabilities, people with injuries from conflict, children, women, and especially older people have the information--and even the soap--they need to stay healthy. Learn more about Humanity & Inclusion's vast COVID-19 response.

    Begin a monthly gift today to help sustain this work and reach as many people as possible.

    Become a monthly donor



  • donated 2020-06-28 19:38:27 -0400

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    A Humanity & Inclusion staff member in Myanmar teaches a Rohingya family how to stay safe from COVID-19.

    Humanity & Inclusion donors ensure that no one is left on the sidelines of aid!

    Your tax-deductible donation helps people with disabilities, victims of natural disasters and conflict, and other vulnerable groups to reclaim their lives and dignity.

    We make every dollar you give count:

    $40 can provide psychosocial support to refugee families

    $75 can provide one year of physical therapy

    $150 can provide a custom-fit wheelchair

    Your donation can also support our emergency actions, for instance delivering care through the projects Humanity & Inclusion has launched to respond to COVID-19.

    *Make a gift for COVID-19 relief.

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    Every gift, small or large, enables us to make a real difference to the lives of people with disabilities around the world. Your gift will be used wherever the need is greatest.
    Thank you.


    Humanity & Inclusion

    Co-recipient of the 1997 Nobel Peace Prize, Humanity & Inclusion (the new name of Handicap International) is a 38-year-old independent and impartial aid organization working in situations of poverty, exclusion, conflict and disaster. We work alongside people with disabilities and vulnerable populations, taking action and bearing witness in order to respond to their essential needs, improve their living conditions and promote respect for their dignity and fundamental rights. 

     

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  • published Demand the U.S. to stop using landmines 2020-06-26 14:44:18 -0400

    Demand the U.S. to stop using landmines

    Target: U.S. President, Donald Trump

    Humanity & Inclusion needs your help. On January 31, President Donald Trump reversed an Obama Administration policy, and decided to allow the U.S. military to again use landmines in conflicts around the world. 

    More than 70% of landmine victims are civilians. In 2018, landmines killed 3,059 and injured 3,837 people. 54% of civilian casualties were CHILDREN. With landmines impacting communities in more than 60 countries and territories, the danger is very real.

    164 countries have signed on to the 1997 Mine Ban Treaty, which prohibits the use, stockpiling, production, and transfer of anti-personnel landmines. In 1997, the U.S. participated in the Ottawa process to ban landmines, but never adopted or signed it. 

    50,342 signatures
    Add signature

  • published Demand the U.S. to stop using landmines 2020-06-26 14:44:16 -0400

    Demand the U.S. to stop using landmines

    Target: U.S. President, Donald Trump

    Humanity & Inclusion needs your help. On January 31, President Donald Trump reversed an Obama Administration policy, and decided to allow the U.S. military to again use landmines in conflicts around the world. 

    More than 70% of landmine victims are civilians. In 2018, landmines killed 3,059 and injured 3,837 people. 54% of civilian casualties were CHILDREN. With landmines impacting communities in more than 60 countries and territories, the danger is very real.

    164 countries have signed on to the 1997 Mine Ban Treaty, which prohibits the use, stockpiling, production, and transfer of anti-personnel landmines. In 1997, the U.S. participated in the Ottawa process to ban landmines, but never adopted or signed it. 

    50,340 signatures
    Add signature

  • donated 2020-06-28 19:28:05 -0400

    Donate Now

    Hala, 4, walks with support from her prosthetic and an HI physical therapist in Yemen.

    Every day, innocent people are killed and disabled by landmines and other explosive devices. Your tax-deductible donation helps victims recover their peace of mind and physical strength. We make every dollar you give count. 

    $40 can provide psychosocial support for a family living through conflict, or natural disaster 

    $75 can provide one year of physical therapy for someone with a conflict-inflicted disability 

    $150 can provide a custom-fit wheelchair, providing mobility to someone in need 

    Humanity & Inclusion 

    Co-recipient of the 1997 Nobel Peace Prize, Humanity & Inclusion (the new name of Handicap International) is a 38-year-old independent and impartial aid organization working in situations of poverty, exclusion, conflict and disaster. We work alongside people with disabilities and vulnerable populations, taking action and bearing witness in order to respond to their essential needs, improve their living conditions and promote respect for their dignity and fundamental rights. 

    Donate

  • published Call for good practices 2020-06-26 11:18:50 -0400

    Call for good practices

    How does your company carry out inclusive recruitment for persons with disabilities?

    According to the International Labor Organization (ILO), 386 million people of working age have disabilities. A recent study shows that the employment-to-population ratio of people with disabilities is 36% on average, compared to the 60% for persons without disabilities. Such difference is deeper in developing countries. This situation is even worse for women with disabilities, who face even more barriers for equal opportunities to access to wage employment.

    However, there are organizations, companies and people advocating for the rights of persons with disabilities, especially, concerning inclusion in the working world. In these efforts, the Michelin Corporate Foundation and Humanity & Inclusion are conducting research on good practices regarding the recruitment process of persons with disabilities. The aim is to promote good and effective disability inclusive recruitment policy in businesses and organizations worldwide, especially in developing countries.

    We invite all businesses and organizations to share their good practices with us! These good practices will serve as an input for our primary research, which will be used to develop an open source technical publication, spotlighting best practices around disability inclusive recruitment, which will be widely disseminated.

    All organizations having submitted a good practice will be named in it, creating a network of companies and Human Resources actors willing to share their experience and learn from each other. Humanity & Inclusion and the Michelin Corporate Foundation will also share the results of the study among various global and local networks, including the ILO Global Business and Disability Network.

    There is no cost to participate, and the businesses who choose to do so have the option to highlight their brand as a disability inclusive employer free of cost.

    What type of businesses and/or organizations can submit their successful practices?

    All businesses and organizations across the globe can apply, regardless of size, nature, and scale of operations.

    They may have in place a well-established policy, or guideline that includes specific steps to be taken for recruitment of persons with disabilities; they also may have hired persons with disabilities without any formal policy in place, and have experimented good practices to share for potential replication.

    What kind of practices can be shared?

    These good practices can relate to any step of the recruitment cycle, from identifying the hiring need to the induction of the new employee. They may be formally documented or informally practiced.

    How to apply?

    The study will be led from June to early September, leading to a publication by the end of 2020.

    • Step 1: Organizations can complete a survey regarding their good practices by following the link below
    • Step 2: All good practices received will be reviewed by a multi stakeholder committee who will choose 15 best practices to highlight. The Committee will be made up of the Michelin Corporate Foundation members, HI members, Disabled persons’ organizations representatives and labor experts.
    • Step 3: The owners of the practices selected will be interviewed to document and collect additional information about their good practice and its impact. We will get in contact with the selected practices in August 2020

    Answer the survey in English.

    Answer the survey in French.

    Answer the survey in Spanish.

    For more information, please contact Chin-Lu Guidotti, Humanity & Inclusion's Graduate Intern, at c.guidotti@hi.org.


  • signed up on Sign up | Videos, stories, and the latest news 2020-07-01 14:38:53 -0400

  • signed up on Sign up | Videos, stories, and the latest news 2020-07-01 14:38:50 -0400

  • published Donate Now in Donate 2020-06-24 14:12:57 -0400

    Donate Now

    Hala, 4, walks with support from her prosthetic and an HI physical therapist in Yemen.

    Every day, innocent people are killed and disabled by landmines and other explosive devices. Your tax-deductible donation helps victims recover their peace of mind and physical strength. We make every dollar you give count. 

    $40 can provide psychosocial support for a family living through conflict, or natural disaster 

    $75 can provide one year of physical therapy for someone with a conflict-inflicted disability 

    $150 can provide a custom-fit wheelchair, providing mobility to someone in need 

    Humanity & Inclusion 

    Co-recipient of the 1997 Nobel Peace Prize, Humanity & Inclusion (the new name of Handicap International) is a 38-year-old independent and impartial aid organization working in situations of poverty, exclusion, conflict and disaster. We work alongside people with disabilities and vulnerable populations, taking action and bearing witness in order to respond to their essential needs, improve their living conditions and promote respect for their dignity and fundamental rights. 

    Donate

  • COVID-19 in Pakistan | Distributing food and keeping vulnerable families safe

    As of June 29, more than 206,500 people have contracted COVID-19 in Pakistan, a country with one of the world’s most highest daily infection rates. Pakistan has not implemented lockdown measures, which makes the situation particularly concerning.

    Humanity & Inclusion donors are assisting the most vulnerable individuals, including Afghan refugees. Their generosity has enabled distributions of food kits, as well as hygiene and prevention kits, to families who need it most in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province, in Peshawar and Peshawar districts. Donors have placed such essential supplies in the homes of 1,840 families.

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    Make a single gift

    Teams are sharing information with Pakistani children and their parents about the risks of COVID-19 and how to stay safe. We’re also spreading awareness messages in Afghan refugee camps and making sure that health professionals working with vulnerable populations know how to protect themselves and the individuals they work with.

    In the video below, Angelina Robinson, Humanity & Inclusion's Director in Pakistan, tells the story of a beneficiary who could not take her sick child to the hospital due to her disability and the ongoing pandemic.

    Focus on the most vulnerable 

    As COVID-19 takes aim at our planet's most vulnerable neighbors, Humanity & Inclusion donors ensure that people with disabilities, people with injuries from conflict, children, women, and especially older people have the information--and even the soap--they need to stay healthy. Learn more about Humanity & Inclusion's vast COVID-19 response.

    Begin a monthly gift today to help sustain this work and reach as many people as possible.

    Become a monthly donor


  • published Help victims of conflict 2020-06-23 14:40:24 -0400

    Help victims of conflict

    Humanity & Inclusion acts and campaign in places where "standing tall" is no easy task

    Over the past four decades, Humanity & Inclusion has evolved into the world's most comprehensive humanitarian mine action organization, working to prevent accidents through education and clearance, and to provide steadfast support the victims.

    Jemerson, 12, from Colombia, holds his prosthetic arm after losing it in a mine explosion.

    When you support Humanity & Inclusion, you help: 

    • Ensure victims can recover from their injuries both physically and mentally;
    • Clear remnants of war so that families can live without fear, in safety;
    • Educate the local population, especially children, how to spot, avoid, and report the weapons they find.

    Please help victims of conflict.
    Make a gift today.

    Share our critical, life-saving petition

    Together, as a community of compassion, we have the power to shift policies that can save and protect innocent lives. Share our petition with your friends  so they can join you in the fight to end the use of explosive weapons in populated areas for good.

    Donate

  • published Demand the U.S. to stop using landmines 2020-06-23 14:19:54 -0400

    Demand the U.S. to stop using landmines

    Target: U.S. President, Donald Trump

    Humanity & Inclusion needs your help. On January 31, President Donald Trump reversed an Obama Administration policy, and decided to allow the U.S. military to again use landmines in conflicts around the world. 

    More than 70% of landmine victims are civilians. In 2018, landmines killed 3,059 and injured 3,837 people. 54% of civilian casualties were CHILDREN. With landmines impacting communities in more than 60 countries and territories, the danger is very real.

    164 countries have signed on to the 1997 Mine Ban Treaty, which prohibits the use, stockpiling, production, and transfer of anti-personnel landmines. In 1997, the U.S. participated in the Ottawa process to ban landmines, but never adopted or signed it. 

    50,336 signatures
    Add signature

  • published Welcome to our community! 2020-06-23 14:16:36 -0400

    Welcome to our community!

    We're so happy to have you!

    Now that you're signed up, you've got the power to inspire your friends and family to follow your lead by joining Humanity & Inclusion or becoming a donor. Send them this link to join today and learn more about what we’re doing in nearly 60 countries by visiting our news page. 

    Keep up with us! 

    Never miss an update. Be sure to like Humanity & Inclusion on Facebook and follow us on Twitter and Instagram. 


  • signed up on Sign up | Videos, stories, and the latest news 2020-07-01 14:38:46 -0400