An in-depth interview with Maud Bellon, Humanity & Inclusion's head of mission in Yemen

An in-depth interview with Maud Bellon, Humanity & Inclusion's head of mission in Yemen

The massive use of explosive weapons has wiped out Yemen

The international coalition led by Saudi Arabia has conducted more than 18,000 air strikes since March 2015. One third of these strikes have hit civilian targets such as homes, hospitals, and schools. 

The mines, which were thought to have been almost eradicated from use in war, are again being used in numbers in Yemen. The 2018 Mine Observatory reports that Houthi forces have used antipersonnel mines and anti-tank mines, mainly on the west coast of the country, near the port of Hodeidah. Yemen today is one of the most contaminated countries with explosive remnants of war and mines in the world.

According to the UN, 6,000 people in Yemen have died and 10,500 civilians have been wounded. Humanity & Inclusion is there, helping Yemenis regain dignity and independence in the war torn country.

Humanity & Inclusion's work in Yemen

Humanity & Inclusion works with local medical teams in six hospitals and two rehabilitation centers in Sana'a, in the north of the country. Our head of mission in Yemen, Maud Bellon, gives an in-depth overview of the disastrous situation.